Michelin Star Extravaganza in Copenhagen

The evening BEFORE our big evening at the Michelin Star restaurant, Kiin Kiin, went like this:

Local Danish friend: Hey guys, where do you want to have dinner tomorrow?

Us: Somewhere delicious, you pick.

Local Danish friend: Ok, how about Thai food? I hear there’s a really good Thai place that I’ve been wanting to try out.

Us: Sounds good.

Cut to THE evening, just a handful of buds heading out for what we assume is a casual night out, sharing some south east asian comfort food…

hhhahaha….boy (girrrrrrrl), were we wrong.

We entered Kiin Kiin, what looked to be a trendy, calming but somewhat traditional Thai restaurant, sat down in a lounge area and waited for a waiter and some menus. However, what really ensued was four and half hours (4 and 1/2 hours!!) of a kind of mindf**k, being served dish after dish of unknown and never before tried ingredients. This description kind of sounds scary, but actually it was amazing!! And interesting, and hilarious at times (hilarious, often because we would be served one of the fanciest dishes we’ve ever laid our eyes on, only to remember that a couple of hours ago, we assumed we’d be eating simple Thai food in a dingy – but awesome – traditional Thai joint).
The evening consisted of 20 dishes in total, along with a wine pairing and took place in two main rooms. These restauranteurs surely deserve their Michelin Star, as it was a unique dining experience unlike any other we’d had, and was full of really delicious dishes. Herewith, a selection of what we ate that night (description in captions):

Oysters, mussels and really pretty seashells from the seashore.

Oysters, mussels and really pretty seashells from the seashore.

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Food, shopping and travel tips from Denmark

The Scandinavian countries had been on my list of places to see and explore for quite some time, and lucky for me I found some enthusiastic participants to come along. My cousins and I managed to coordinate our somewhat opposing schedules so that we had 10 days to skip out on work (i.e. actually still working, but from laptops and iPhones at various coffee shops and apartments). We decided two countries was in our cards and chose Denmark and Sweden, and as soon as we left the airport (we started out in Copenhagen), the stereotypes were in full force: clean architectural lines mixed with old european details, a bunch of lookalikes – light coloured hair, tall, lean build and fashionable without taking too many risks, and pastry shops and furniture design houses in every direction.

A typical street in Copenhagen.

A typical street in Copenhagen…and we just finished scarfing down a bunch of pastries.

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